Early Verge Fusee with Rare Date Dial Pair Case Fisher Pocket Watch

Early Verge Fusee with Rare Date Dial Pair Case Fisher Pocket Watch

183-21EA
Early Verge Fusee with Rare Date Dial Pair Case Fisher Pocket Watch
Processing...

Early Verge Fusee with Rare Date Dial Pair Case Fisher Pocket Watch

183-21EA

1 available for immediate delivery

Product Details


Early Verge Fusee with Rare Date Dial Pair Case Fisher Pocket Watch
England; Fisher; Serial# 42; C. 1770’s
CASE: The yellow gilt, 48mm pair case features shagreen decorations.
DIAL: This white porcelain dial displays Roman numerals and beetle/poker hands.
MOVT: This key-wind/key-set movement with verge escapement is gilt with a full plate layout and is signed. The watchmakers skill is evident with an abundance of scroll work and attention to detail including the square baluster pillars separating the plates and finely engraved face on the balance cock.
C 3 (The case is in very good condition)
D 3-57 (The dial is in very good condition, slightly restored)
M 3 (The movement is in very good condition)
R 8 (Rarity on a scale of #1 being very common to #10 being extremely rare)
Experts Opinion: Besides the very rare dial option on this watch, it is protected by a shagreen case with copper rivets in a floral pattern on the case’s back.  EA

Verge Fusee Escapement
Used in antique spring-powered mechanical watches and clocks, a fusee is a cone-shaped pulley with a helical groove around it, wound with a cord or chain which is attached to the mainspring barrel. Fusees were used from the 15th century to the early 20th century to improve timekeeping by equalizing the uneven pull of the mainspring as it ran down. The mainspring is coiled around a stationary axle (arbor), inside a cylindrical box, the barrel. The force of the spring turns the barrel.

Key-wind/Key-set Movements
The very first pocket watches up until the third quarter of the 19th century had key-wind and key-set movements.  A watch key was necessary to wind the watch and to set the time.  This was usually done by opening the case back and putting the key over the winding-arbor (which was set over the watch's winding-wheel, to wind the mainspring) or by putting the key onto the setting-arbor, which was connected with the minute-wheel and turned the hands.  Some watches of this period had the setting-arbor at the front of the watch, so that removing the crystal and bezel was necessary to set the time. 

This watch includes a reproduction of the correct size key, it is not the original.

Pair Case
Higher end early verge fusee watches were often in a pair case. Pair case refers to when a pocket watch is placed within another case (nesting), therefore two cases.