Guilloche Enamel 18K Gold Case Ladies Vaucher Pendant Watch

Guilloche Enamel 18K Gold Case Ladies Vaucher Pendant Watch

183-22EA
$1,575.00
Guilloche Enamel 18K Gold Case Ladies Vaucher Pendant Watch
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Guilloche Enamel 18K Gold Case Ladies Vaucher Pendant Watch

183-22EA
$1,575.00

1 available for immediate delivery

Product Details


Guilloche Enamel 18K Gold Case Ladies Vaucher Pendant Watch
France; Vaucher; Lady’s; Serial# 153; CA1810
CASE: The 18K multicolor gold, 37mm case has an open face and enamel decorations.  Weighs 28.7 DWTS = 44.7 Grams TW.
DIAL: This white porcelain dial displays Roman numerals and Breguet hands.
MOVT: This verge fusee key-wind/key-set movement with verge escapement is gilt with a full plate layout and is signed.
C 3-47 (The case is in very good condition, hairline)
D 3-54 (The dial is in very good condition, chipped, winding aperture)
M 3 (The movement is in very good condition)
R 8 (Rarity on a scale of #1 being very common to #10 being extremely rare)
Experts Opinion: Bright medium green, opaque white and blue enamel grace this highly engraved 18K case. The watch bezel is garnished with a ring of seed pearls.  EA


Guilloché (or guilloche) is a decorative engraving technique in which a very precise intricate repetitive pattern or design is mechanically engraved into an underlying material. Specifically, it involves a technique of engine turning, using a machine of the same name, also called a rose engine lathe. This improved upon the more time-consuming practice of making similar designs by hand and allowed for greater delicacy, precision, and closeness of the line, as well as greater speed.

Verge Fusee Escapement
Used in antique spring-powered mechanical watches and clocks, a fusee is a cone-shaped pulley with a helical groove around it, wound with a cord or chain which is attached to the mainspring barrel. Fusees were used from the 15th century to the early 20th century to improve timekeeping by equalizing the uneven pull of the mainspring as it ran down. The mainspring is coiled around a stationary axle (arbor), inside a cylindrical box, the barrel. The force of the spring turns the barrel.

Key-wind/Key-set Movements
The very first pocket watches up until the third quarter of the 19th century had key-wind and key-set movements.  A watch key was necessary to wind the watch and to set the time.  This was usually done by opening the case back and putting the key over the winding-arbor (which was set over the watch's winding-wheel, to wind the mainspring) or by putting the key onto the setting-arbor, which was connected with the minute-wheel and turned the hands.  Some watches of this period had the setting-arbor at the front of the watch, so that removing the crystal and bezel was necessary to set the time. 

This watch includes a reproduction of the correct size key, it is not the original.