14K Gold 16 Size Hunter Case Elgin Pocket Watch with Fancy Dial

14K Gold 16 Size Hunter Case Elgin Pocket Watch with Fancy Dial

183-24TE
$2,550.00
14K Gold 16 Size Hunter Case Elgin Pocket Watch with Fancy Dial
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14K Gold 16 Size Hunter Case Elgin Pocket Watch with Fancy Dial

183-24TE
$2,550.00

1 available for immediate delivery

Product Details


14K Gold 16 Size Hunter Case Elgin Pocket Watch with Fancy Dial
U.S.; Elgin; Man’s; Serial# 10,294,707; C. 1903
CASE: The 14K yellow gold, 16-size, No. 312,852 hunter case features floral decorations and is signed Roy.  Weighs 71.1 DWTS = 110.5 Grams TW.
DIAL: This fancy porcelain dial displays outside 5-minute track, subsidiary seconds dial, Arabic numerals, has spade hands and is signed Elgin.
MOVT: This 15-jewel, stem-set, No. 10,294,707 movement with lever escapement is nickel with a ¾ plate layout and is signed Elgin.
C 2 (The case is in perfect condition)
D 2 (The dial is in perfect condition)
M 2 (The movement is in perfect condition)
R 8 (Rarity on a scale of #1 being very common to #10 being extremely rare)
Experts Opinion: 14K yellow gold, 16-size unused hunter case, which has a patina color from being stored away for years and the Elgin also has a mint fancy porcelain multicolor dial. An Ashland super condition 112-year-old watch!  TE


Hunter Cases
A hunting case covers the face of the watch concealing the dial. The case is opened by pressing the stem or the crown of the watch. Hold the watch in your right hand with the bow between the index finger and thumb. Press on the pendant-crown with the right thumb to release the cover exposing the face. When closing, do not SNAP the cover. Press the crown to move the catch in, close the cover, then release the crown. This will prevent wear on the rim and catch.

Stem-wind, Lever-Set Movements
Mandatory for all railroad watches after roughly 1908, this kind of pocket watch was set by opening the crystal and bezel and pulling out the setting-lever (most hunter cases have levers accessible without removing the crystal or bezel), which was generally found at either the 10 or 2 o'clock positions on open-faced watches, and at 5:00 on hunting cased watches. Once the lever was pulled out, the crown could be turned to set the time. The lever was then pushed back in and the crystal and bezel were closed over the dial again. This method of time setting on pocket watches was preferred by American and Canadian railroads, as lever setting watches make accidental time changes impossible. After 1908, lever setting was generally required for new watches entering service on American railroads.