ROSE GOLD ANTIQUE QUARTER HOUR REPEATER KEYWIND POCKET WATCH C1800 | BRANDT, JEANRENAUD & ROBERT, 18K ROSE GOLD CASE

ROSE GOLD ANTIQUE QUARTER HOUR REPEATER KEYWIND POCKET WATCH C1800 | BRANDT, JEANRENAUD & ROBERT, 1

ANTIQUE-GOLD-POCKET-WATCH-SP62019-16-AI
$3,750.00
ROSE GOLD ANTIQUE QUARTER HOUR REPEATER KEYWIND POCKET WATCH C1800 | BRANDT, JEANRENAUD & ROBERT, 1
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ROSE GOLD ANTIQUE QUARTER HOUR REPEATER KEYWIND POCKET WATCH C1800 | BRANDT, JEANRENAUD & ROBERT, 1

ANTIQUE-GOLD-POCKET-WATCH-SP62019-16-AI
$3,750.00

1 available for immediate delivery

Product Details


18K Rose Gold Brandt, Jeanrenaud & Robert 57mm Pocket Watch
Swiss; Brandt, Jeanrenaud & Robert; Mans; C. 1800
Complications: ¼ hour repeater and alarm.
CASE: The 18K rose gold, 57mm, plain polished, swing-out case has an open face.
DIAL: This white porcelain dial displays Arabic numerals and fancy hands.
MOVT: This 4-jewel, key-set movement with cylinder escapement is gilt with a full plate layout and is signed.
CONDITIONS:
C 3 (The case is in very good condition)
D 2 (The dial is in perfect condition)
M 3 (The movement is in very good condition)

Quarter Hour Repeater
The quarter repeater strikes the number of hours, and then the number of quarter hours since the last hour.  The mechanism uses 2 chimes of different tones.  The low tone usually signals the hours, and the high tone the quarter hours.  As an example, if the time is 2:45, the quarter repeater sounds 2 low tones and after a short pause 3 high ones: "dong, dong, ding, ding, ding".  Alternatively, some use a pair of tones to distinguish the quarter hours: "dong, dong, ding-dong, ding-dong, ding-dong"

Key-wind/Key-set Movements
The very first pocket watches up until the third quarter of the 19th century had key-wind and key-set movements.  A watch key was necessary to wind the watch and to set the time.  This was usually done by opening the case back and putting the key over the winding-arbor (which was set over the watch's winding-wheel, to wind the mainspring) or by putting the key onto the setting-arbor, which was connected with the minute-wheel and turned the hands.  Some watches of this period had the setting-arbor at the front of the watch, so that removing the crystal and bezel was necessary to set the time. 

This watch includes a reproduction of the correct size key, it is not the original.

Cylinder escapement
The horizontal or cylinder escapement replaced the verge escapement was much thinner than the verge, allowing watches to be made thinner.
Clockmakers found it suffered from excessive wear, so it was not much used during the 18th century, except in a few high-end watches with the cylinders made from ruby.

The French solved this problem by making the cylinder and escape wheel of hardened steel and the escapement was used in large numbers in inexpensive French and Swiss pocket watches and small clocks from the mid-19th to the 20th century.
Instead of pallets, the escapement uses a cutaway cylinder on the balance wheel shaft, which the escape teeth enter one by one.

Each wedge-shaped tooth impulses the balance wheel by pressure on the cylinder edge as it enters, is held inside the cylinder as it turns, and impulses the wheel again as it leaves out the other side.
The wheel usually had 15 teeth, and impulsed the balance over an angle of 20° to 40° in each direction. It is a frictional rest escapement, with the teeth in contact with the cylinder over the whole balance wheel cycle.